September 10, 2015 11:06 am

RENOVATING THE COMEDOR "FE Y ESPERANZA"

Written by  Rosali Vela
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We want to thank our Chapter at McGill University for their amazing support to the local comedor "Fe y Esperanza". If you want to read more about this comedor's story you can click here. Follow the timeline to see how this comedor was built!

1For many years Martha has worked in what are locally called the comedores populares or "Soup Kitchens". Sixteen years have passed since Martha, together with 70 other mothers, founded the 'Faith and Hope' cafeteria, located in the settlement of Cumbre. In daily shifts, four or five women voluntarily prepare food purchased with the help from PRONAA (National Food Assistance Program), this subsided food is delivered to the comedor approximately every three or four months.

2This cafeteria is run by women, mostly mothers, who coordinate shifts and responsibilities to prepare lunch at low and affordable prices thanks to government subsidies. The food delivered through the government program, called PRONAA, includes staples such as flour, rice, sugar, and beans.

4In spite of the quality and the love with which the work is done, it is undeniable that the facilities for this service are less than ideal. On arriving to the premises it is immediately obvious that there are many shortcomings. The floor is not properly paved, the walls and ceiling are a set of old, dirty timbers, and the cooking utensils are poor quality. In addition, some of the volunteer mothers have to bring their small children and, given the reduced space, children are put in contact with all areas of the kitchen, thus being exposed to potential health and safety dangers.

5MEDLIFE, through it's network of chapters and students, started seeking for support Martha and all the volunteer mothers. With the collaboration of McGill chapter, the dream of a better place began to come true.

6As soon as the funds were ready to be used, the community started to work on construction.

7During the construction, all comedor's activities had to be done out side...even the cooking!

8Winter could be really rainy in the hills of Pamplona. An improvised roof had to be made to keep all the kitchen materials dry and safe during the contstruction.

9Carlos and Martha sharing a hug. The walls are starting to dry.

10The roof is probably the hardest part of construction. The kitchen couldn't stop working through the construction! Many people benefit from the comedor's services and they will continue cooking no matter what.

12The roof is now ready to be filled with cement. Martha's husband is the one leading the whole construction.

13Martha next to the almost-ready comedor. She has been overseeing the process since the very beginning.

14Once the roof is ready Carlos and the interns are even able to walk over it!

15Thanks to the support of the volunteers during a mobile clinic, the comedor is now painted and ready for the inauguration!

16Our volunteers are the first to dine in the new comedor! There was even enough money to buy a large table and some kitchen materials.

17From the outside the comedor looks totally different than it did before. Now it is a clean, safe and comfortable for people to have quality meals.

19Our whole staff thanks McGill for their contribution! We know that Martha and the comedor's team will be always be grateful for their support!

Last modified on September 15, 2015 9:29 am