March 21, 2017 4:46 pm

MEDLIFE visits areas affected by flooding

Written by  Rosali Vela
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Historic flooding and mudslides have hit Peru bringing the worst destruction from floods in two decades. An estimated 70,000 people have been displaced from their homes along with an estimated 72 dead due to the natural disaster.

Referred to locally by the Quechua name of huaicos, these natural disasters are a results of heavy rain brought on by the El Niño season in the Pacific ocean. The rains cause the rivers to overflow bringing floods to the normally dry desert coast of Peru.

IMG 0952Armando Calderon points to where his house was before the huaicos.

The flooding has overwhelmed local water treatment plants and Lima, Peru’s capital city, has been without water for almost a week. The Peruvian government has issued a state of emergency around most of the country as floods and debris flow into the streets.

The rains are predicted to continue into April, bringing more flooding to the already affected areas. Areas with vulnerable access to water have been completely cut off from their normal supply. The aguatero trucks that normally suppply many of our communities with water have stopped visiting, and many supermarkets have completely run out of water. Tap water was not working in large parts of the city for up to a week, and receiving intermitent water in other parts. 

IMG 0971A railroad is decimated by flash floods from huaicos in Chaclacayo.

Critical infrastructure has been damaged, the bridge that connects El Augostino y San Juan de Lurigancho collapsed due to the overflow of the huaicoloro river, makes access to the district very difficult. Many other roads and railroad tracks have been completely washed away.

This week, MEDLIFE went to survey the communities we work with around Lima that have experienced flooding, to make a plan for immediate relief aid and possibly plan a development project for the future. We visited Chaclacayo, a district hit badly by the force of the huaicos 

Screen Shot 2017 03 21 at 5.35.12 PMThe Chaclacayo District is one of many regions in Peru affected by the huaicos.

IMG 1010The village of Brisas de California, in the hills of Chaclacayo, experienced flooding and mudslides taking out bridges throughout the village. 

In Chaclacayo, people are lacking basic necessities like food, shelter, medicine and water. People in the valley experienced flash floods after surges of water hit the Rîmac River. The floods swept away homes, railroads and roads in it’s path.

 

IMG 0920Victims of the huaicos have been using tents as temporary shelter.

 

Those displaced by the huaicos have been seeking shelter in encampments of tents provided by the municipality of Lima. Guadelope, a resident of Chaclacayo, has been sleeping in a tent with her daughter since their home was flooded. When asked what she needed most, she responded with food.

With forecasts of more rain, the situation is expected to worsen bring more huaicos to the already vulnerable communities.

We have started a fundraising campaign to go directly to communities affected by the flooding. You can donate HERE. During times of natural disaster, direct donations can have the most impact because the money is going directly towards supplies for victims to start rebuilding their lives like food, water and medicine.

 IMG 1037In Brisas de California, huaicos overwhelmed the waterway, eroding the banks and taking out bridges.

Sources: 

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-peru-floods-idUSKBN16O2V5

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-39318034

http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/death-toll-rises-72-peru-rains-flooding-mudslides-46225609

https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2017/03/peru-suffers-worst-flooding-in-decades/520146/

http://gestion.pe/economia/huaico-huaycoloro-ocasiono-caida-puente-talavera-san-juan-lurigancho-2184846

 

Last modified on August 2, 2017 2:33 pm