Last Friday the MEDLIFE summer interns joined the community members of Union de Santa Fe to inaugurate the completion of a new staircase. Not only will this provide safe and secure access to several homes but is the main point of access to the newly constructed second floor of the Wawa Wasi.

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Thank you to all the 2017 summer interns for the help on this project and all your work over the last three months. 

IMG 3052The summer interns delivering plants to decorate the area around the new staircase.

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IMG 3137The traditional MEDLIFE red paint adds some color to the new staircase.

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IMG 3445Balloons are a vital part of any MEDLIFE inauguration here in Lima and with the addition of a heart the finishing touches are compete.

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IMG 3673MEDLIFE staff and the 2017 summer interns at the base of the completed staircase.

 

August 8, 2017 10:52 AM

MEDLIFE Staircase Construction Stories

Written by Rosali Vela

WHY STAIRCASES?

Our Staircase Construction Projects were inspired by the story of a MEDLIFE patient, Chais Pipa. Chais fell down the steep hillside that leads to her home, prompting a premature birth and health complications for her newborn child.

After speaking to Chais and other community members, we learned that several health problems were related to falls and the inability to navigate the steep terrain of Pamplona Alta.

As a result, MEDLIFE began building staircases in these regions and has continued to do so ever since.

FEATURED STORIES

Read more stories here!

Nadine Heredia is a community in Lima, Peru established in 2012. MEDLIFE has been working in Nadine since its founding and this week we will complete our eight staircase project. 
 1Nadine Heredia Community.
 
Fabiola Rosales (age 29), is a member of one of the 350 families who have benefited from this project. She has been living in Nadine since 2014 at the highest part of the hill, next to the “Wall of Shame”, a wall emblematic of the class divide in Lima, separating the district of San Juan de Miraflores from Surco which is one of the wealthiest areas in Lima.  
 
2Fabiola Rosales holding her baby.
 
Three days after giving birth to her son Alonso, Fabiola fell on the steep hillside. She believes the community will be better once the staircase is built because it will be easier to climb up and down to her house, and most importantly, it will reduce the number of accidents that occur when children go outside to play with their friends.
 
The first staircases in Nadine were built by each manzana, or block. This reflected a fragmented sense of unity, community members would only participate in the staircase that was benefiting their street, they would not help other blocks build their staircases. This attitude became toxic to the community; it created hostility between neighbors and also limited their progress. Building a staircase requires a lot of people to mix the cement to form a chain to pass buckets up the hill and level off each individual step. Without the support of neighbors from all streets, building a staircase takes twice as long and may never be finished.
 
 IMG 3799Jose Sanchez (red shirt) working at the staircase.
 
When Jose Sanchez (age 30) became the community leader of Nadine last year, he set out with one goal: to improve the relationship between the neighbors so the entire community could work together towards a common good. “I think this can be achieved by applying something that I learned when I was in school in 2000. One of my teachers said that one of the best ways to motivate people to support you is through facts,” says Jose. Jose never misses the weekly Sunday community meeting and tries to involve people in the projects by telling the truth. In Peru, it is very common to find unfinished projects due to organizations who make promises they are unable to keep. In these meetings, if Jose says that a staircase will be built, the community members believe him. When people see you meet the demands of the community, they start to get involved. Jose's hard work is starting to pay off;  in the staircase we're building this week, we have more community members from all blocks participating than in any other staircase we have built with them.
 
Despite working night shifts, Jose supervised the staircase project every day and helped the community members and the group of MEDLIFE volunteers in Lima this week. He hopes that teamwork will prevail and that someday the people of Nadine will have the same motivation he does to accomplish every project. “To the community, to the ones who are parents like me, we are inspired everyday to accomplish our inner goal: to provide a better quality of life to our children so that they have a better life than we did.” 
 

 IMG 39578th Staircase inauguration at Nadine Heredia.

 MEDLIFE recently completed our second of two massive staircases in Ecuador, drastically improving access to the community of Llinllin Santa Fe. The path is used by the communities school children to get to school, and now they can safely descend the mountainside to their school. 

IMG 6371The project required lots of teamwork between volunteers and locals, and was constructed over the course of 8 MEDLIFE volunteer trips.

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IMG 6348Volunteers helped carry bags of cement and rocks for the base up the hillside.

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IMG 6546 The view from the hillside was spectacular!

IMG 6555The staircase was built over a very steep section of hillside!

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December 22, 2016 8:29 AM

Mapping Bathroom and Staircase Projects

Written by Jake Kincaid

MEDLIFE has completed over 207 projects in Peru and 74 in Ecuador. Many of these projects are either Stair Cases or Hygiene projects, both of which have been a core component of MEDLIFE’s work from the beginning.

The majority of these projects had GPS coordinates saved for them in an archive. We decided to map them to get a sense of the scope of MEDLIFE’s between 2004 and 2017. Included in the map are the locations of most of the staircases, bathrooms, and a few school projects. Keep in mind, around 100 projects are missing from this map because we don’t have the coordinates. Can you find the project from your Mobile Clinic? Look for the year and month of the clinic.

In the steep hillsides of Villa Maria de Triunfo and San Juan De Miraflores, a simple concrete staircase can change lives. Families living in the area have no access to running water and instead are forced to haul buckets back and forth to their houses from large plastic containers filled daily by passing trucks. This task is not only time consuming but incredibly dangerous as the damp winter climate transforms the roads and pathways into slippery, eroding descents.

Adults and children alike are slowed down by the downward climb on their way to school and work, and fall-related injuries are common and costly. By building stairs, MEDLIFE is able to make the cumbersome daily journey easier, safer, and faster. It also is an important step in securing land titles and access to the public water system.

In 2011, The World Health Organization (WHO) declared diarrhoeal diseases to be the second leading cause of death in low-income countries. The WHO and UNICEF estimate that functional, clean bathrooms can reduce cases of diarrhea by more than 33%; simply being able to wash your hands with soap can reduce cases of diarrhea by more than 40%. Yet, for approximately 2.5 billion people, or 35% of the world's population, there is no functioning bathroom at all. If rural areas do not have functioning facilities, they are slower to be expanded upon and improved.

For MEDLIFE Ecuador, bathroom construction projects are an integral part of the health care work that we do. Projects are typically focused on rural, majority indigenous communities on the outskirts of cities. These areas are geographically isolated from access to reliable potable water and improved sanitation.

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